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Can the young save democracy from the grip of neoliberalism and populism?

Can the young save democracy from the grip of neoliberalism and populism?

Populism is not just a symptom of older people’s nostalgia for traditional values, writes Henrik P Bang. It is a rejection of a global neoliberal creed that pits individuals against each other. The hard-won social capital and notions of fairness that older generations prize have been replaced by a race for success in which human relationships exist […]

2017: the first General Election where online news overtook TV

2017: the first General Election where online news overtook TV

Until recently, television was the single most popular source of news. Now online sources have overtaken it as younger generations turn to apps and social media. Research from the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism shows only the BBC has a bigger reach than Facebook. Rasmus Klein Neilsen explains how trust in journalists and journalism, particularly […]

Not without prejudice: LGBT politicians talk about how Parliament has changed

Not without prejudice: LGBT politicians talk about how Parliament has changed

This month the Constitution Unit at UCL hosted a panel discussion on LGBT candidates in UK elections, exploring the UK parliament’s evolution to include more openly LGBT politicians than any other state legislature. The panel, chaired by Dr Jennifer Hudson, consisted of Professor Andrew Reynolds and four of the UK’s most prominent LGBT politicians: Angela Eagle, […]

Watch | Religious intolerance and its impact on democracy – Asma Jilani Jihangir & Amartya Sen

Watch | Religious intolerance and its impact on democracy – Asma Jilani Jihangir & Amartya Sen

‘It is a question of tolerating intolerance’: Asma Jilani Jahangir and Professor Amartya Sen discuss the impact of religious intolerance on democracy in a lecture at the LSE. Jahangir is a Pakistani human rights lawyer and social activist who co-founded and chaired the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan. Sen is Thomas W. Lamont University Professor, and […]

It’s distasteful – but giving a despot an easy way out can stop further bloodshed

It’s distasteful – but giving a despot an easy way out can stop further bloodshed

In this exclusive extract from Brian Klaas’ new book, The Despot’s Accomplice, he argues that – however distasteful it may be to the principle of justice – offering despots a way out can prevent further bloodshed. This is because they frequently know they have nothing to lose by fighting to the death. Furthermore, research shows […]

How can we find out whether people are really turning against democracy?

How can we find out whether people are really turning against democracy?

Democracy is in decline – or so a growing consensus suggests. Paul Schuler sets out the evidence for claims that people are turning to autocratic alternatives, and asks whether they necessarily show a loss of faith in democracy. He proposes some alternative measures that could establish whether people are genuinely willing to trade freedom for a […]

How Australian activists used Obama-style micro-targeting in the 2016 elections

How Australian activists used Obama-style micro-targeting in the 2016 elections

Micro-targeting, or data-driven fieldwork, was pioneered by Barack Obama’s presidential campaigns and has now spread to Australia. Stephen Mills explains how activists in different parties and pressure groups used it to target voters in the 2016 elections. Volunteers’ enthusiasm for this form of campaigning marks a turning point in Australian politics. Similar PostsMarriage from hell: what […]

The Decline of Policy Mandates in Australia

The Decline of Policy Mandates in Australia

Ruling parties often make reference to having a ‘mandate from the people’ for their actions, but refrain from mentioning this concept while in opposition. Ross Stitt analyses data showing that less and less Australian voters are participating in primary elections. As the primary vote of incoming governments declines, so too does the level of any potential policy […]

Support for Brexit is no longer a minority viewpoint on the British left

Support for Brexit is no longer a minority viewpoint on the British left

In recent years, Euroscepticism has frequently been associated with the right of the political spectrum in the UK, but a number of figures on the left have also voiced their support for the country leaving the EU. Imke Henkel writes that while criticism of the EU’s handling of the Eurozone and migration crises is understandable, […]

The biggest lesson from the Scottish Parliament election: if you are determined to make and act on the argument about identity politics you should do it well

The biggest lesson from the Scottish Parliament election: if you are determined to make and act on the argument about identity politics you should do it well

Scotland recently re-elected the SNP to run the Scottish government, albeit with a reduced majority. A new development was the rise of the Scottish Conservatives, who claimed second place after an increased vote share. Here, Paul Cairney discusses the implications the vote has for a potential future second independence referendum. Similar PostsScottish Parliament election preview: […]

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