Crowdsourcing the Constitution

Beyond the binary: what might a multiple-choice EU referendum have looked like?

Beyond the binary: what might a multiple-choice EU referendum have looked like?

Voters in the EU referendum could choose only between leaving and remaining – with no say on whether to stay in the single market, renegotiate a different deal or even integrate more fully with the EU. Lily Blake argues a multiple-choice referendum of the kind held occasionally abroad would have been less divisive, set a […]

20 things we learned about democracy in March 2015

20 things we learned about democracy in March 2015

The General Election is (nearly) here! And here at Democratic Audit UK, we’ve been ferreting away trying to find the most interesting clumps of information, conjecture, opinion and miscellaneous. Collating it all for your pleasure, as ever, is Sean Kippin, who has been helped enormously by the launch of the Democratic Dashboard – a new voter resource bringing […]

A written British constitution would do much to enhance Britain’s democracy and the wellbeing of its citizens

A written British constitution would do much to enhance Britain’s democracy and the wellbeing of its citizens

Britain famously has no written constitution, opting instead to govern itself with reference to a set of conventions, laws, and traditions without formal codification. Vittorio Trevitt argues that this system has past its sell-by date, and should be replaced by a written constitution.  Similar PostsFive minutes with Graham Allen: “unlike most democracies, the UK lacks […]

Citizens’ assemblies provide an institutional foothold for republican political practices

Citizens’ assemblies provide an institutional foothold for republican political practices

Calls for a UK citizens convention to assess and rethink our current political and democratic arrangements have been frequently heard in the wake of the referendum on Scottish independence, held last autumn. John Grant argues that these conventions can be useful in providing an institutional foothold for republican ideas, which have struggled to find a policy […]

20 things we learned about democracy in January 2015

20 things we learned about democracy in January 2015

Christmas is over, 2015 is here, and the General Election we are constantly being told is only a matter of (tens of) days away. As the locomotive that is British democracy chugs back into gear after its winter break, we are left, as ever, questioning whether we actually learned anything new. Fortunately, Democratic Audit UK’s Sean […]

Should a codified UK constitution include reform or attempt to describe current arrangements?

Should a codified UK constitution include reform or attempt to describe current arrangements?

Most advocates of constitutional reform agree on the basic desirability of a written constitution, but to what end? Should it seek to codify our existing political and constitutional arrangements, or put in place a new settlement? Here, Richard Gordon tackles this question, looking at the competing viewpoints that surround the issue.  Similar PostsInterview: Richard Gordon on […]

Can a constitutional convention offer real and radical change?

Can a constitutional convention offer real and radical change?

Following an economic and financial crisis in 2009, Ireland became one of the first countries that attempted to provide for a citizen-led programme of constitutional reform. Senator Ivana Bacik speaks about her experience as a politician who took part in the Irish Constitutional Convention. She suggests that a constitutional convention can offer real and radical change. Similar PostsWe need a root and branch review […]

20 things we learned about democracy in November 2014

20 things we learned about democracy in November 2014

Traditionally, November isn’t a particularly pleasant month, with autumn giving way to winter, and Christmas just too far away to provide any real solace. But did we learn anything about democracy that might cheer us up? Democratic Audit’s Sean Kippin does his best to do just that, bringing us factoids about white vans, immigration, Prime […]

20 things we learned about democracy in October 2014

20 things we learned about democracy in October 2014

What happened in October 2014 that democrats will find interesting? Lots, it turns out, including revelations about the position of names on ballot papers, drones, and of course UKIP. Sean Kippin rounds up 20 interesting pieces of information that made themselves known this month.  Similar Posts20 things we learned about democracy in January 2015How democratic […]

20 things we learned about democracy in September 2014

20 things we learned about democracy in September 2014

September 2014 was a big month for democracy, with party conferences and of course the Scottish independence referendum. Democratic Audit’s Sean Kippin rounds up 20 things that we learned about democracy this month, and talks about the referendum and conferences, but also elections in the House of Lords, human rights, and KFC chicken.  Similar PostsThe […]

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