New Labour and after: the toxic consequences of cynical party management

New Labour and after: the toxic consequences of cynical party management

The New Labour years saw sweeping cultural change designed to replace the traditional internal Labour party democracy with a new organisational culture. Its effects are still felt today. Emmanuelle Avril explains how the struggles in today’s Labour have their roots in Blair’s brand of party management and Labour’s continuing (dys)function as an organisation. Similar PostsLabour’s century-old problem: Leadership performanceLabour has been too slow […]

Letting the sun shine in – for a while: why (most) US presidents embrace openness

Letting the sun shine in – for a while: why (most) US presidents embrace openness

Most US politicians with ambitions to shake up the status quo say they want more openness in government – though many of them go off the idea after they acquire power. Donald Trump, however, is not interested in either open government or the usual nods to transparency that presidential candidates offer. But as he is […]

A prison of our own design: divided democracy in the age of social media

A prison of our own design: divided democracy in the age of social media

Social media companies such as Facebook can sort us ever more efficiently into groups of the like-minded, creating echo chambers that amplify our views, writes Cass R Sunstein in an edited extract from #Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media. It’s no accident that on some occasions, people of different political views cannot […]

Book review | Why the UK Voted for Brexit: David Cameron’s Great Miscalculation

Book review | Why the UK Voted for Brexit: David Cameron’s Great Miscalculation

In Why the UK Voted for Brexit: David Cameron’s Great Miscalculation, Andrew Glencross offers an analysis of Brexit. While the pace of developments since the book’s publication inevitably makes some of its observations prematurely obsolete, this remains an important and historically sensitive account of this momentous event in the domestic and international political landscape, writes Chris Moreh.  […]

If you believe Brexit is a mistake, you have a democratic duty to oppose it

If you believe Brexit is a mistake, you have a democratic duty to oppose it

Is there a duty to implement the EU referendum result? Not if you believe it to be a profound mistake, argues Albert Weale. We cannot sensibly and intelligibly use the language of ‘the will of the people’ in respect of the referendum result. It is not simply a device for the registering of the preferences of […]

Going local – but does decentralisation actually make for more innovative policy?

Going local – but does decentralisation actually make for more innovative policy?

The mayoral elections in May are part of a plan put in place by George Osborne to reinvigorate local government in the UK. “The old model of trying to run everything in our country from the centre of London is broken,” he said in 2015. But does decentralisation make government more innovative – and if […]

No need for basic income: five policies to tackle the loss of jobs to technology

No need for basic income: five policies to tackle the loss of jobs to technology

Not all the jobs lost to new technology are likely to be replaced. A universal basic income has been touted as a solution to the problem of under-employment – but, argues Henning Meyer, it would lead to even greater inequality. He suggests five alternative policies that could help tackle the problem of technological unemployment. Similar […]

Lyin’, crooked, loser: how negative affective language influences people’s votes

Lyin’, crooked, loser: how negative affective language influences people’s votes

With his frequent characterisations of his opponents as “lyin’” or “crooked”, Donald Trump’s use of language during his 2016 presidential election campaign was a departure from previous contests. In new research, Stephen M. Utych examines the effects of this sort of emotional, negative language on political decision-making. Through experimental studies, he finds that when such […]

Book review | Hate Speech  and Democratic Citizenship, by Eric Heinze

Book review | Hate Speech and Democratic Citizenship, by Eric Heinze

In Hate Speech and Democratic Citizenship, Eric Heinze argues for the unrestricted right to freedom of speech in contemporary democratic states, positioning it as one of the ‘legitimising expressive conditions’ of democratic citizenship. While some readers may take issue with Heinze’s particular conceptualisation of democracy and his account of the potential risks of hate speech, this […]

Gender equality in Parliament: how random selection could get us there

Gender equality in Parliament: how random selection could get us there

Would choosing the second chamber by sortition be an effective way to achieve a 50:50 balance between men and women? John Dryzek argues that the upper chamber – in Australia as in the UK, a deliberative forum – would be a good place to start, and looks at ways to ensure women sitting in deliberative […]

Supporter of Post Navigator Premium WordPress Plugins