Democratic Audit UK staff

ros taylorRos Taylor is Managing Editor of Democratic Audit. She also co-edits LSE Brexit and is a freelance journalist and editorial consultant. She holds an MPhil from the University of Cambridge. Before joining DA she worked at the Guardian and the BBC. r.taylor6@lse.ac.uk Twitter @rosamundmtaylor

 

imageProfessor Patrick Dunleavy is the Co-Director of Democratic Audit. He studied Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, graduating in 1973. He moved to Nuffield College, Oxford to work on his D.Phil (published as The Politics of Mass Housing in Britain, 1945-75) until 1978. He became a Junior Research Fellow at Nuffield in 1976. He moved briefly to the Open University as Lecturer in Urban Studies (1978-9) before joining LSE as a Lecturer. He was promoted successively to Reader in 1986 and Professor in 1989. Subsequently he founded LSE Public Policy Group in 1992. He became a (founding) member of the Academy of the Social Sciences in 1999. He can be found on Twitter at @PJDunleavy

 

Hopkin-Jonathan-PhotoDr Jonathan Hopkin is the Co-Director of Democratic Audit. He was awarded his doctorate in Social and Political Sciences from the European University Institute in 1995, and held lectureships at the Universities of Bradford, Durham and Birmingham before joining LSE in 2004. He has held various visiting positions in Spain, Italy and the United States, and is also an Associate Fellow of the Johns Hopkins University Bologna Center in Italy. His research has mostly focused on parties and elections in Western Europe (and specifically Italy, Spain and the UK), with particular attention to corruption, political finance, and territorial politics.

He is the author of Party Formation and Democratic Transition in Spain (Macmillan 1999), and has published in a range of journals including the European Journal of Political ResearchGovernanceParty Politics, the Review of International Political Economy andWest European Politics. His current research focuses on the emergence of party cartels in advanced democracies, and the relationship of partisan politics to income inequality and welfare state change. He can be found on Twitter at @jrhopkin

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