Why Labour can’t get a grip: the power v principles conundrum

Why Labour can’t get a grip: the power v principles conundrum

Labour’s future direction is at stake. Its leader has the backing of a large part of the membership, yet appears to have no prospect of forming a government in order to deliver upon his vision. Although the trigger was the (tokenistic) addition of Jeremy Corbyn on the ballot paper in 2015, the crisis is caused […]

Don’t let them lie: how we can start holding political advertising to account

Don’t let them lie: how we can start holding political advertising to account

Politicians have always lied, writes Alex Parsons, and claims we have entered an era of ‘post-truth politics’ are themselves misleading. Nonetheless, efforts to hold political advertising to account in Britain have failed because of the lack of party consensus on the issue. While commercial advertising can be banned by the Advertising Standards Authority, it has […]

Reforming Australia’s Senate means ensuring Indigenous people are represented

Reforming Australia’s Senate means ensuring Indigenous people are represented

Before the 2016 federal election in July, Australia’s coalition government demonstrated a rare degree of collaboration with the Greens and passed changes to reform the electoral process for the Senate. Richard Reid explains the reform and its intentions – and its complete failure in the wake of Australia’s double dissolution election. He argues the debate about Senate reform should go […]

Justice outsourced: why Concentrix’s tax credit mistakes matter

Justice outsourced: why Concentrix’s tax credit mistakes matter

Administrative justice issues rarely attract the attention they deserve. However, the recent revelations about the tax credit checks undertaken by Concentrix on behalf of HMRC – and the poor service inflicted upon people – highlights a fundamental challenge to administrative justice posed by outsourcing and privatisation. Robert Thomas and Joe Tomlinson argue that the episode highlights […]

The Danish effect: when citizens agree with public policy, they’re satisfied with democracy too

The Danish effect: when citizens agree with public policy, they’re satisfied with democracy too

Inevitably, most of the people who didn’t vote for the party or parties in power will be less happy with the policies they implement. But in a survey of European countries, Christian Stecker and Markus Tausendpfund found this dissatisfaction extends to their opinion of the state of democracy in general, particularly when the government’s policies on […]

Book Review: Strangers in Our Midst: The Political Philosophy of Immigration by David Miller

Book Review: Strangers in Our Midst: The Political Philosophy of Immigration by David Miller

In Strangers in Our Midst: The Political Philosophy of Immigration, David Miller defends the ability of states to control their borders and exercise the right to exclude immigrants on the basis of community goals and preferences. Alex Sager argues that the book’s central argument regarding this ‘weak cosmopolitan’ position is largely founded on myth, omission and the misrepresentation of empirical evidence; thus, […]

Posted in: Book reviews
Now give us our own referendum: how Brexit could energise Europe’s insurgent parties

Now give us our own referendum: how Brexit could energise Europe’s insurgent parties

The Brexit vote could be an early sign of a European political tsunami, as upstart “insurgent” political parties across the continent use referendums as their weapon of choice to challenge the traditional political elites, write Suzi Dennison and Dina Pardijs. Their research for the European Council on Foreign Relations found that these parties are calling for […]

Does terrorism work? Why we need to answer the question – however difficult it is

Does terrorism work? Why we need to answer the question – however difficult it is

In his new book, Richard English attempts to answer a question many would prefer not to contemplate: does terrorism work? Are its perpetrators right to judge that the only way to achieve the changes they want is through violence? English goes on focus on four of the most significant terrorist organisations of the last half-century: al-Qaida, the […]

Now Indonesia has a sovereign wealth fund – and it won’t be the last

Now Indonesia has a sovereign wealth fund – and it won’t be the last

Little noticed by the wider world, Indonesia’s government recently announced details of the creation of one of the largest sovereign wealth funds in the region. Juergen Braunstein and Arianne Caoili argue the coming years will see a new wave of sovereign wealth funds, especially in countries with large state-owned enterprises. Similar PostsChina’s rise is not […]

So much for #pencilgate: the referendum wasn’t rigged – but Britain’s electoral machinery needs fine-tuning

So much for #pencilgate: the referendum wasn’t rigged – but Britain’s electoral machinery needs fine-tuning

Despite widespread fears to the contrary, the EU referendum passed off without major problems. But the vote revealed underlying problems with Britain’s electoral system – most notably the difficulty of registering to vote. Toby S James and Alistair Clark, authors of a new report by the Electoral Commission on the quality of electoral administration at […]

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