No need for basic income: five policies to tackle the loss of jobs to technology

No need for basic income: five policies to tackle the loss of jobs to technology

Not all the jobs lost to new technology are likely to be replaced. A universal basic income has been touted as a solution to the problem of under-employment – but, argues Henning Meyer, it would lead to even greater inequality. He suggests five alternative policies that could help tackle the problem of technological unemployment. Similar […]

Lyin’, crooked, loser: how negative affective language influences people’s votes

Lyin’, crooked, loser: how negative affective language influences people’s votes

With his frequent characterisations of his opponents as “lyin’” or “crooked”, Donald Trump’s use of language during his 2016 presidential election campaign was a departure from previous contests. In new research, Stephen M. Utych examines the effects of this sort of emotional, negative language on political decision-making. Through experimental studies, he finds that when such […]

Book review | Hate Speech  and Democratic Citizenship, by Eric Heinze

Book review | Hate Speech and Democratic Citizenship, by Eric Heinze

In Hate Speech and Democratic Citizenship, Eric Heinze argues for the unrestricted right to freedom of speech in contemporary democratic states, positioning it as one of the ‘legitimising expressive conditions’ of democratic citizenship. While some readers may take issue with Heinze’s particular conceptualisation of democracy and his account of the potential risks of hate speech, this […]

Gender equality in Parliament: how random selection could get us there

Gender equality in Parliament: how random selection could get us there

Would choosing the second chamber by sortition be an effective way to achieve a 50:50 balance between men and women? John Dryzek argues that the upper chamber – in Australia as in the UK, a deliberative forum – would be a good place to start, and looks at ways to ensure women sitting in deliberative […]

The trouble with Jeremy Corbyn: five tests the Labour leader is failing

The trouble with Jeremy Corbyn: five tests the Labour leader is failing

Much of the Parliamentary Labour Party want to replace Jeremy Corbyn, and his popularity among the general public is low. Yet he was resoundingly re-elected by party members last autumn. Patrick Diamond assesses the Labour leader’s performance as an opposition leader according to five criteria, and concludes the risk of a Labour schism between ‘principles’ and […]

Throughout history, only violent and catastrophic events have significantly cut inequality

Throughout history, only violent and catastrophic events have significantly cut inequality

Are mass violence and catastrophes the only forces that can seriously decrease economic inequality? To judge by thousands of years of history, the answer is yes, argues Walter Scheidel in this extract from his new book, The Great Leveller: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the 21st Century. Over thousands […]

Not without prejudice: LGBT politicians talk about how Parliament has changed

Not without prejudice: LGBT politicians talk about how Parliament has changed

This month the Constitution Unit at UCL hosted a panel discussion on LGBT candidates in UK elections, exploring the UK parliament’s evolution to include more openly LGBT politicians than any other state legislature. The panel, chaired by Dr Jennifer Hudson, consisted of Professor Andrew Reynolds and four of the UK’s most prominent LGBT politicians: Angela Eagle, […]

Book review | The Cabinet Office 1916-2016, by Anthony Seldon

Book review | The Cabinet Office 1916-2016, by Anthony Seldon

The Cabinet Office: 1916-2016, written by Anthony Seldon with Jonathan Meakin, offers a detailed history of the Cabinet Office from its creation during World War I up to the present as well as the 11 Cabinet Secretaries that have served as part of this constant, if somewhat hidden, presence in the otherwise changing political landscape of the UK. […]

What the ECJ’s ruling on headscarves means (and why it may be tough to enforce)

What the ECJ’s ruling on headscarves means (and why it may be tough to enforce)

The European Court of Justice’s ruling this week does not ban employees from wearing headscarves at work, contrary to some media coverage. Rather, it allows bosses to ban them – along with other symbols of religious belief – if the job is customer-facing and the workplace has a neutrality policy. Steve Peers predicts that such bans may […]

Watch | Religious intolerance and its impact on democracy – Asma Jilani Jihangir & Amartya Sen

Watch | Religious intolerance and its impact on democracy – Asma Jilani Jihangir & Amartya Sen

‘It is a question of tolerating intolerance’: Asma Jilani Jahangir and Professor Amartya Sen discuss the impact of religious intolerance on democracy in a lecture at the LSE. Jahangir is a Pakistani human rights lawyer and social activist who co-founded and chaired the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan. Sen is Thomas W. Lamont University Professor, and […]

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